Black Cult: McCain Melanoma Contagious

Senator McCain Has New Contagious SKin CancerSenator John McCain is believed to be carrying the new Contagious Skin Cancer strand and many members of the Republican party as well as fellow senator Joe Lieberman, who recently endorsed McCain, may be steering clear of him because they fear contracting it.This new type of contagious skin cancer is believed to be transmittable only among fair-skinned people. It is believed that both the ADA and CDC are remaining silent on it fearing a public panic.

“Fairskinned people are the agents carrying and transmitting this new skin cancer nightmare,” a leading dermatologist wishing to remain unidentified says. “We’ve found it is only transmittable between fairskinned people. Carriers can be identified by a change in their skin color. Exposed areas of their bodies, like their face, hands, arms and neck inflame and become very red.

“We’re finding as long as this skin condition lasts they will transmit skin cancer to other fair skinned people with whom they come into contact with. We’ve also learned it is most likely only caused by the skin disorders triggered in whites from blacks.”
“This is a nightmare, one public health administrator said. There is currently no vaccination for it and is transmittable by simple touches like handshake.

SEE: Whites Banned From Earth, Seek New Planet Before Consumed by Sun

What do you call a white, black & Mexican GI who hit a roadside bomb in Iraq? Savannahnow.com Can’t Take an Iraq Joke but report war

Joke of the Day

Submitted by luciphemannuels on Sun, 2008-01-20 12:31. :: crash test dummies | George Bush | Intown | Iraq War

Joke of the Day:
What do you call a white, black and MexicanGI who hit a roadside bomb in Iraq?


George Bush Jr. Crash Test Dummies
Free Image Hosting
Anybody know any other good jokes? LOL!

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User Comments

Are you kidding me!!

You have obviously NEVER served this country or lost anyone close to you in these wars! You are an insensitive fool that should really think twice about what you write or joke about. I don’t care for a minute if you “didn’t mean to offend” or “it wasn’t about the soldiers”! Tell that joke to one of those soldier’s battle buddies and see what happens to you. 100 out of 100 would punch you in the mouth. Maybe next time you have such a joke, you should keep it to yourself!

You should have voiced your opinion to the Pres.

David, who is doing the soldiers disrespect except those who sent them there.

I punch back, punk.

Maybe next time you should fight to keep them from going to a war like this.

I will look to the hills from which cometh my help

What have I done to offend your sensibilities

to such a degree where you attack me so hostilely with each encounter? Have you no civility. Intellectuals can discuss without hostility. Oh, as things go I just answered my own question. You aren’t intellectual and have no civility.

The joke is not about the soldiers. I see why that stupid cat, Sylvester, is your avatar.

Sylvester is a tuxedo cat who shows much pride in himself, and never gives up. Despite (or perhaps because of) his pride and persistence, Sylvester was, with rare exceptions, placed squarely on the “loser” side of the Looney Tunes winner/loser hierarchy. His character was basically that of Wile E. Coyote while he was chasing mice or birds. (One cartoon episode The Wild Chase paired Sylvester and Wile E. Coyote against the Road Runner and Speedy Gonzales. In the end both Sylvester and Wile E. fail as usual.) He shows a different character when paired with Porky Pig in explorations of spooky places, in which he doesn’t speak as a scaredy cat. (In these cartoons, he basically plays the terrified Costello to Porky’s oblivious Abbott.) Perhaps Sylvester’s most developed role is in a series of Robert McKimson-directed shorts, in which the character is a hapless mouse-catching instructor to his dubious son, Sylvester Junior, with the “mouse” being a powerful baby kangaroo. His alternately confident and bewildered episodes bring his son to shame, while Sylvester himself is reduced to nervous breakdowns.

At least you are quick enough to know you are a stupid loser.

My avatar is a Griffon:

The griffin, griffon or gryphon[1] (from Old French grifon[2]) is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature.[3] In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine.[4]

Most contemporary illustrations give the griffin the forelegs of an eagle, penis of a horse, and with an eagle’s legs and talons, although in some older illustrations it has a lion’s forelimbs; it generally has a lion’s hindquarters, however. Its eagle’s head is conventionally given prominent ears; these are sometimes described as the lion’s ears, but are often elongated (more like a horse’s), and are sometimes feathered. Some writers describe the tail as a serpent, in the manner of a chimera.[citation needed]

You will never catch Tweety. I am the Legendary. We are who we are.

I will look to the hills from which cometh my help

We call them heroes, Waldo,

a name which would never be applied to the sort of person you are in your tiny encapsulated yellow egg shell. I know a good joke and it is a blogger named, luciphermannuels, first dead weight of the day, every day.

What have I done to you to such a degree where you

attack me so hostilely with each encounter? Have you no civility. Intellectuals can discuss without hostility. Oh, as things go I just answered my own question. You aren’t intellectual and have no civility.

The joke is not about the soldiers. I see why that stupid cat, Sylvester, is your avatar.

Sylvester is a tuxedo cat who shows much pride in himself, and never gives up. Despite (or perhaps because of) his pride and persistence, Sylvester was, with rare exceptions, placed squarely on the “loser” side of the Looney Tunes winner/loser hierarchy. His character was basically that of Wile E. Coyote while he was chasing mice or birds. (One cartoon episode The Wild Chase paired Sylvester and Wile E. Coyote against the Road Runner and Speedy Gonzales. In the end both Sylvester and Wile E. fail as usual.) He shows a different character when paired with Porky Pig in explorations of spooky places, in which he doesn’t speak as a scaredy cat. (In these cartoons, he basically plays the terrified Costello to Porky’s oblivious Abbott.) Perhaps Sylvester’s most developed role is in a series of Robert McKimson-directed shorts, in which the character is a hapless mouse-catching instructor to his dubious son, Sylvester Junior, with the “mouse” being a powerful baby kangaroo. His alternately confident and bewildered episodes bring his son to shame, while Sylvester himself is reduced to nervous breakdowns.

At least you are quick enough to know you are a stupid loser.

My avatar is a Griffon:

The griffin, griffon or gryphon[1] (from Old French grifon[2]) is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature.[3] In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine.[4]

Most contemporary illustrations give the griffin the forelegs of an eagle, penis of a horse, and with an eagle’s legs and talons, although in some older illustrations it has a lion’s forelimbs; it generally has a lion’s hindquarters, however. Its eagle’s head is conventionally given prominent ears; these are sometimes described as the lion’s ears, but are often elongated (more like a horse’s), and are sometimes feathered. Some writers describe the tail as a serpent, in the manner of a chimera.[citation needed]

You will never catch Tweety. I am the Legendary. We are who we are.

I will look to the hills from which cometh my help

Hope you don’t have a little Andrea Yates on your hands?

Peachrose, I took a closer look at your grand daughter(?), this morning. Is she(?) mentally okay? I only ask because she appears to be already extremely disillusioned. If you haven’t had any type of psychological examination performed on her, I HIGHLY suggest you do. She’s got something WAY more severe than ADD. The type of disillusion visible in her eyes is problematic and needs psychiatric attention. I’m not saying you’ve got an Andrea Yates on your hands; but she’s certainly a candidate. See the links below and let’s get her checked out immediately!

Respectfully, if I had to make a diagnosis on looks alone, I’d say she’s(?) suffering from Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Unfortunately, it’s the most severe childhood disorder. They say it can be positively affected if treated early? How old is she(?). I’m doing some research to find what percentage of children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder commit suicide. I’m also doing some research to distinguish Pervasive Developmental Disorder behavioral traits from mental retardation traits.

Anyway, A quick excerpt of Pervasive Developmental Disorder is below:

Thought to be the most severe of psychiatric disorders afflicting children, pervasive developmental disorders strike 10 to 15 in every 10,000 children. The disorders affect intellectual skills; responses to sights, sounds, smells and other senses; and the ability to understand language or to talk. Youngsters may assume strange postures or perform unusual movements. They may have bizarre patterns of eating, drinking or sleeping.

Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

children and depression
children and attention deficit disorder
children and anxiety
children and simple phobias
children and separation anxiety
children and conduct disorder
children and pervasive developmental disorder

“If we paid no more attention to plants than we have to our children we would now be living in a jungle of weeds.”

That sentiment, expressed by the late 19th-century naturalist and plant expert Luther Burbank, still bears some truth today. Concern about children’s health has certainly increased since Burbank’s day. But that concern has not translated into knowledge about children’s mental health. Of 12 million American children suffering from mental illness, fewer than one in five receive treatment of any kind. That means that eight out of 10 children suffering from mental illness do not receive the care they need. By comparison, 74 percent or nearly three out of four children suffering from physical handicaps receive treatment.

For much of history, childhood was considered a happy, idyllic period of life. Children were not thought to suffer mental or emotional problems because they were spared the stresses adults must face. Research conducted since the 1960s, however, shows that children do suffer from depression and manic-depressive and anxiety disorders, illnesses once thought to be reserved for adults. From 3 to 6 million children suffer from clinical depression and are at high risk for suicide, the third leading cause of death among young people. Every hour, 57 children and teenagers try to kill themselves; every day 18 succeed.

Between 200,000 and 300,000 children suffer from autism, a pervasive developmental disorder that appears in the first three years of life. Millions suffer from learning disorders–attention deficit disorder, attachment disorders, conduct disorders and substance abuse.

Parents whose children suffer from these illnesses often ask themselves, “What did I do wrong?” Self-blaming is not appropriate, since the causes are complex and never due to any single factor. Research indicates that many mental illnesses have a biological component which makes a child susceptible to the disorder. Feelings of guilt about a child’s mental illness are often as inappropriate as feelings of guilt about other childhood illnesses or about inherited health problems.